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JURIS DOCTOR (JD)

The Juris Doctor (JD) is a three-year program that provides students a solid intellectual foundation on which to build their legal education. First-year students will cover core principles and concepts, theory, and skills of legal practice and providing a through grounding in fundamental legal reasoning and analysis. Second and third-year students will present the opportunity to focus studies on areas of particular interest through advanced classes, clinics, and writing projects.

JD DEGREE REQUIREMENTS


The College of Law offers only a full-time legal education program. Students are expected to complete the requirements for a JD degree within 3 years (no fewer than 5 semesters [fall and spring] of the regular academic year. Students wishing to graduate in 5 semesters should consult with the dean of students prior to making a decision).  Failure to complete the requirements for the JD  degree within four (4) years shall require submitting a Petition for Readmission to the College of Law Readmission Committee. In no event shall the JD degree be completed later than 84 months (seven years) after a student has commenced law study at the College of Law or a law school from which the College of Law has accepted transfer credit.

The following is a list of College of Law requirements, in addition to the requirements of ABA, for candidates seeking a JD degree:

  • Total Credit Hour Requirements - 90 credits (unless you are part of graduating Class of 2022, than 88 credits)
  • Minimum Required GPA - 2.5
  • First-Year Required Courses: 31 credits (unless you are part of graduating Class of 2022, than 30 credits)
  • Upper-Level Requirements: 59 credits (unless you are part of graduating Class of 2022, than 58 credits)
MINIMUM CREDIT HOUR RULES
  • Full-Time Status: A student must be enrolled for no less than 9 credit hours during each semester of the regular academic year to be considered a full-time student. (Full-time status for financial aid purposes may require additional credit hours.)  Enrollment for less than 9 credit hours during the regular academic year requires approval from the Dean of Student Affairs.
      • It is recommended that students take at least 15 credit hours each semester in order to reach the 90 credit hour requirement for graduation.
  • Directed Faculty Instruction: A student must complete 64 credit hours in courses that require attendance in regularly scheduled sessions or direct faculty instruction (including directed research, in-house clinics, and asynchronous online courses). These 64 credit hours cannot include externships, teaching assistantships, competitions, publications, and/or graduate course credit earned outside the law school.
MAXIMUM CREDIT HOUR RULES
  • Externship: A student may earn a maximum of 14 credit hours in the repeatable Externship course.
  • Other Academic Credit: A student may earn a maximum of 12 credits hours for ungraded teaching assistantships, competitions, and/ or student publications.
  • Directed Research & Directed Studies: A student may earn a maximum of 6 credit hours for Directed Research/Studies. No more than 3 credit hours of LAW 7971 (Track 1 Directed Research) or 2 credit hours of LAW 7972 (Track 2 Directed Studies) in any semester. No more than 3 credit hours per semester in any combination of Directed Research and Directed Studies.
  • Maximum Per Semester Credits: A student may not be enrolled for more than 18 credit hours during any semester.
  • Non-Law Graduate Courses: A student may earn no more than 6 credit hours graduate-level, nonlaw school coursework, as approved by the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs.
  • Ungraded Courses: A student may earn no more than 18 credit hours of ungraded credit (pass/fail ) in residence. Students may select ONE class as CR/NC (may not elect Constitutional Law II, Legal Profession, seminar, or course needed for certificate). This does not include transferred credit allowed for graded non-law school courses or graded courses taken at another law school.

 

A student must earn at least 64 credits through courses that require attendance at regularly scheduled classroom sessions or direct faculty instruction (ABA Standard 311).  Courses that MAY NOT count toward the 64 credits include (1) Externship Credit, (2) intramural competitions (e.g., Traynor Moot Court), (3) publications (e.g., Law Review), and (4) graduate course credit earned outside the law school (see Academic Policies and Procedures § 4, Non-Law School Credit).

FIRST-YEAR COURSE REQUIREMENTS

The law school registers students for all first-year courses. First-year students may not register for upper-division classes.

  • LAW 6000 - Introduction to Law
      • First-year law students begin fall classes one week prior to the beginning of the regular fall semester with an Orientation and Introduction to Law Week. Orientation provides incoming students with basic information on how the law school functions and includes mandatory sessions on setting up computer accounts, exam policies, academic discipline policies, and financial aid. Introduction to Law, taught by the law school faculty, is a pass/fail course which is required for graduation. Introduction to Law acquaints first-year students with methods of legal study and provides them with a preview of the coming year. The week is rounded out with social events sponsored by the law school and student organizations.
  • LAW 6040 - Civil Procedure
  • LAW 6060 - Constitutional Law I
  • LAW 6080 - Contracts
  • LAW 6100 - Criminal Law
  • LAW 6120 - Property
  • LAW 6140 - Torts
  • LAW 6180 - Legal Methods
  • LAW 6180 - Legal Research
SECOND & THIRD YEAR REQUIREMENTS

The following courses are required for graduation and MUST be taken in the second or third year:

  • LAW 7410 - Constitutional Law II
  • LAW 7900 - Legal Profession
  • Seminar Writing Requirement
      • LAW 7800 OR LAW 7971 OR an approved course by the Academic Dean.
  • Portfolio Requirement - Minimum of 3 (some courses meet 2 portfolio req).
  • Experiential Requirement - Minimum of 6 credit hours in clinics, externships, or simulation courses.
  • Electives

Each student must demonstrate competence in legal research and writing by successfully completing (1) the First-Year Legal Writing Requirement and (2) both components of the Seminar Writing Requirement for Second and Third Year Students.

  • First-Year Legal Writing Requirement
    • The first-year Legal Methods course.
  • Seminar Writing Requirement for Second and Third Year Students
    1. Receive a minimum grade of B or better.
    2. The Seminar Paper shall meet the following criteria:
      • Address a significant issue or set of issues related to law.
      • Provide original, in-depth, and critical analysis of the issue, including doctrinal, comparative, institutional, interdisciplinary, theoretical, and/or policy analysis. The paper shall not merely describe, survey, or summarize legal materials or existing scholarship.
      • Demonstrate substantial legal research, evidenced by extensive, relevant, and supportive citations to diverse sources.
      • Be written logically, clearly, and concisely, with proper grammar and spelling.
      •  Consist of at least 7,000 words, excluding footnotes, endnotes, and/or bibliography.
      • Meet all standards of academic integrity.
    3. The following steps shall be taken in preparing the Seminar Paper:
      • The student shall develop the paper topic in consultation with a faculty member.
      • If the paper involves research on human subjects, the student shall obtain prior approval from the University of Utah Institutional Review Board (IRB).
      • The faculty member shall review and comment extensively on at least one complete draft of the paper and should encourage multiple drafts.
      • The student shall revise the paper in response to faculty review and comment.
      • The faculty member shall require that the paper be reviewed using plagiarism detection software before submitting a final grade.
      • The faculty member shall review and grade the final draft of the paper.
    4. The Seminar Paper requirement will presumptively be satisfied by producing the paper in a Seminar (Law 7800) course.
    5. The Seminar Paper may also be satisfied by producing a paper for:
      • a think tank;
      • a course taught by a tenured, tenure track, or another full-time faculty member in which a Seminar Paper option is offered (for a list of such courses, contact the Associate Dean for Students or the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs); or
      • subject to the approval of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, a Directed Research Project that both (i) replicates the rigor of a Seminar Paper and (ii) fills a clearly defined gap that is not otherwise met by the law school curriculum.
    6. A seminar course (Law 7800) will automatically fulfill the Seminar Paper requirement.  However, Seminar Papers written for a think tank or other course (as listed above) or as a Directed Research project (as listed abovee) shall be deemed satisfied when a faculty member certifies to the Registrar’s office that the Seminar paper has met all requirements necessary to make a paper a Seminar Paper.
      • The Seminar Paper requirement may not be fulfilled with a paper written for law review or journal credit.
    7.  A portfolio of written materials produced during the second and third years of law school for which the student receives academic credit.
      • This requirement must be satisfied by completing three items from one or more of the following categories:
        • a law journal comment or note that is accepted for credit;
        • a significant transactional document, such as a business planning document, a contract, a financing instrument, a securities disclosure, a will, or a similar written product;
        • a significant proposed legislative bill or agency regulation based on underlying research;
        • a significant litigation document, such as a complaint, summary judgment motion and supporting memorandum, a motion to compel or resist discovery and supporting memorandum, a motion in limine on an evidence issue, a trial brief, proposed findings of fact and conclusions of law, or similar written product;
        • a brief for a moot court competition;
        • legal writing for an externship or clinic determined by the full-time faculty member overseeing the externship or clinic to be a substantial work product;
        • a significant research paper that is not used to satisfy the Seminar Paper requirement.
        • a paper was written for a class in lieu of an exam;
        • other significant papers may be approved by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.
    8. Each student shall obtain a signed certification from the faculty member who supervised each particular item of writing.  The faculty member’s signature must certify that the item constitutes partial fulfillment of this portfolio requirement.  Each student shall submit to the Registrar a certification signed by the student that this portfolio requirement has been fulfilled, and shall attach thereto the certifications that faculty members have signed for each portfolio item.

DUAL DEGREES


Juris Doctor/Master of Business Administration (MBA):

The S.J. Quinney College of Law and the David Eccles School of Business has adopted the following program to enable students to pursue both a JD degree and an MBA degree simultaneously.

  • Reduction in Overall Credit Requirement

The JD/MBA program is based on the assumption that, because there is complementary intellectual benefit from studying law and business administration in a coordinated program, a student enrolled in the dual degree program should be allowed to earn both degrees in less time and with a lower overall credit requirement than were that student enrolled in each school or program independently. Accordingly, students enrolled in the dual degree program may count up to 12 credit hours of College of Law class work towards fulfilling the 62.0 credit-hour requirement of the MBA degree and may count up to 12 credit hours of MBA class work towards fulfilling the 90 credit-hour requirement of the JD degree. Upon completion of both programs, the student earns two separate degrees, a JD degree awarded by the College of Law and an MBA degree awarded by the School of Business.

Because the overall credit requirements for both degrees are reduced by 24 credit hours, a student enrolled in the dual degree program can expect to complete the two degrees in approximately eight semesters of full-time study. However, as noted in § i. below, a student enrolled in the JD/MBA dual Degree Program must complete all JD and all MBA requirements before either degree will be awarded.

  • Application to the JD/MBA Dual Degree Program

Applicants interested in this program must submit separate admission applications to the College of Law and to the Business School. Each program has its own independent admissions standards, and admission to one program does not ensure admission to the other.

Applicants interested in pursuing the JD/MBA dual degree are encouraged to apply to both programs at the same time. Nonetheless, a law student may apply to the MBA program (and thus be eligible to earn a dual degree) prior to completion of the first year of law school. As noted in § iii. below, an MBA student who enrolls in the law program after matriculating in the MBA program will have limitations imposed on those MBA credit hours that can count towards the law degree.

  • Completion of First Year at the College of Law as Prerequisite for Law Credit for MBA Courses

The College of Law will not give law credit for an MBA course unless the applicant has first successfully completed the first year at the College of Law. This prerequisite means that applicants who start the dual degree program by doing work in the MBA program before completing the first year of law school must delay taking the specific MBA courses they intend to count towards their 12 hours of law credit until after they complete the first year of law school. The College of Law strongly recommends that an applicant not take any MBA courses during the first year of law school. The first year of law school is demanding.

  • Enrollment in the JD/MBA Dual Degree Program and Appointment of Faculty Advisors in Both Programs

A student who has been admitted to both the JD and MBA programs and who wishes to pursue the dual degree program opportunity must file a Dual Degree Enrollment Form with the Registrar of each program. Upon filing this form and it's being approved by the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs in the College of Law and the MBA Program Director in the School of Business, a Faculty Advisor will be appointed in each program to assist the student in planning an overall program of study that takes advantage of the goals of the dual degree program.

  • Requirements for Cross-Over Course Credit

To earn academic credit towards a law degree for coursework completed in the MBA program: (1)an MBA course must be pre-approved by the College of Law Faculty Advisor, and that approval must be indicated on the “Petition for Non-Law School/Dual Degree Credit” Form; (2) the course must be a graduate-level course and not part of the first-year MBA curriculum; and (3) the student must receive a grade of 3.0 (“B”) or higher in the course.

To earn academic credit towards the MBA degree for coursework completed in the College of Law: (1) the course may not be part of the law school’s first-year curriculum; (2) the student must receive a grade of 3.0 (“B”) or higher in the course; and (3) the course must be pre-approved by the MBA Faculty Advisor.

  • Notification to Associate Dean of Academic Affairs of Enrollment Only in MBA Courses

A student in the JD/MBA Dual Degree Program who during any semester is enrolled only in MBA courses shall notify the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs of that fact.

  • Notification to MBA Program Advisor of Enrollment Only in College of Law Courses

A student in the JD/MBA Program who during any semester is enrolled only in College of Law courses shall notify the MBA Program Advisor of that fact.

  • College of Law Seminar Writing Requirement

The College of Law Seminar Writing Requirement will not be waived for students in the JD/MBA Dual Degree Program. No MBA research paper or other work product will satisfy this requirement. Students enrolled in the JD/MBA Dual Degree Program are encouraged to select a seminar at the College of Law that involves the subject matter of relevance to business, but it is not required.

  • Completion of Both Programs Required for Award of Each Degree

A student enrolled in the JD/MBA Dual Degree Program who wishes to count credits taken in one program toward fulfilling the degree in the other program must complete all requirements of both programs before either degree will be awarded.

 

Juris Doctor/ Master of City and Metropolitan Planning (MCMP)

The S.J. Quinney College of Law and the College of Architecture + Planning have adopted the following program to enable students to pursue both Juris Doctor (JD) and Master of City & Metropolitan Planning (MCMP) degrees simultaneously.

  • Reduction in Overall Credit Requirement

The JD/MCMP program is based on the assumption that, because there is complementary intellectual benefit from studying law and city and metropolitan planning in a coordinated program, a student enrolled in the dual degree program should be allowed to earn both degrees in less time and with a lower overall credit requirement than were that student enrolled in each program independently. Accordingly, students enrolled in the dual degree program may count up to 12 credit hours of College of Law class work towards fulfilling the 49-51 credit-hour requirement of the MCMP degree, and may count up to 12 credit hours of MCMP class work towards fulfilling the 90 credit-hour requirement of the JD degree. Upon completion of both programs, the student earns two separate degrees, a JD degree awarded by the College of Law and an MCMP degree awarded by the College of Architecture +Planning.

Because the overall credit requirements for both degrees are reduced by 24 credit hours, a student enrolled in the dual degree program can expect to complete the two degrees in approximately 8 semesters of full-time study. However, as noted in Section iii. below, an MCMP student who enrolls in the law program after matriculating in the MCMP program will have limitations imposed on those MCMP credit hours that can count towards the law degree.

  • Application to the JD/MCMP Dual Degree Program

Applicants interested in this program must submit separate admission applications to the College of Law and to the Department of City & Metropolitan Planning. Each program has its own independent admissions standards, and admission to one program does not ensure admission to the other.

Applicants interested in pursuing the JD/MCMP dual degree are encouraged to apply to both programs at the same time. Nonetheless, a law student may apply to the MCMP program (and thus be eligible to earn a dual degree) prior to completion of the first year of law school. As noted in Section iii below, an MCMP student who enrolls in the law program after matriculating in the MCMP program will have limitations imposed on those MCMP credit hours that can count towards the law degree.

  • Completion of First Year at the College of Law as Prerequisite for Law Credit for MCMP courses.

The College of Law will not give law credit for an MCMP course unless the applicant has first successfully completed the first year at the College of Law. This prerequisite means that applicants who start the dual degree program by doing work in the MCMP program before completing the first year of law school must delay taking the specific MCMP courses they intend to count towards their 12 hours of law credit until after they complete the first year of law school.

The College of Law strongly recommends that an applicant not take any MCMP courses during the first year of law school. The first year of law school is demanding.

  • Enrollment in the JD/MCMP Dual Degree Program and Appointment of Faculty Advisors in Both Programs.

A student who has been admitted to both the JD and MCMP programs and who wishes to pursue the dual degree program opportunity must file a Dual Degree Enrollment Form with the Registrar or Admissions Officer of each program. Upon filing this form and its being approved by the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs in the College of Law and the MCMP Program Coordinator, an advisor will be appointed in each program to assist the student in planning an overall program of study that takes advantage of the goals of the dual degree program.

  •  Requirements for Cross-Over Course Credit.

To earn academic credit towards a law degree for coursework completed in the MCMP program: (1) an MCMP course must be pre-approved by the student’s College of Law advisor, and that approval must be indicated on the “Petition for Non-Law School/Dual Degree Credit” Form; and (2) the student must receive a grade of 3.0 (“B”) or higher in the course.

To earn academic credit towards the MCMP degree for coursework completed in the College of Law: (1) the course may not be part of the law school’s first-year curriculum; (2) the student must receive a grade of 3.0 (“B”) or higher in the course; and (3) the course must be pre-approved by the student’s MCMP advisor.

  • Notification to Associate Dean of Academic Affairs of Enrollment Only in MCMP Courses

A student in the JD/MCMP Dual Degree Program who during any semester is enrolled only in MCMP courses shall notify the law school’s Associate Dean of Academic Affairs of that fact.

  • Notification to MCMP program Advisor of Enrollment Only in College of Law Courses

A student in the JD/MCMP Dual Degree Program who during any semester is enrolled only in College of Law courses shall notify the MCMP Program Coordinator of that fact.

  • College of Law Seminar Writing Requirement

The College of Law Seminar Writing Requirement will not be waived for students in the JD/MCMP Dual Degree Program, and no MCMP research paper or other work product will satisfy this law school requirement.

  • MCMP Professional Project Requirement

The MCMP program requires that every student complete a professional project. This requirement will not be waived for students in the JD/MCMP Dual Degree Program, and no JD research paper or project will satisfy this MCMP

  • Completion of Both Programs Required for Award of Each Degree

A student enrolled in the JD/MCMP Dual Degree Program who wishes to count credits taken in one program toward fulfilling the degree in the other program, must complete all requirements of both programs before either degree will be awarded.

Juris Doctor/Master of Public Administration (MPA)

The S.J. Quinney College of Law and the Department of Political Science has adopted the following program to enable students to pursue both a JD degree and an MPA degree simultaneously.

  • Reduction in Overall Credit Requirement

The JD/MPA program is based on the assumption that, because there is complementary intellectual benefit from studying law and public administration in a coordinated program, a student enrolled in the dual degree program should be allowed to earn both degrees in less time and with a lower overall credit requirement than were that student enrolled in each school or program independently. Accordingly, students enrolled in the dual degree program may count up to 12 credit hours of College of Law class work towards fulfilling the 42 credit hour requirement of the MPA degree, and may count up to 12 credit hours of MPA class work towards fulfilling the 90 credit hour requirement of the JD degree. Upon completion of both programs, the student earns two separate degrees, a JD degree awarded by the College of Law and an MPA degree awarded by the Department of Political Science.

Because the overall credit requirements for both degrees are reduced by 24 credit hours, a student enrolled in the dual degree program can expect to complete the two degrees in approximately eight semesters of full-time study. However, as noted in § l. below, a student enrolled in the JD/MPA Dual Degree Program must complete all JD and all MPA requirements before either degree will be awarded.

  • Application to the JD/MPA Dual Degree Program

Applicants interested in this program must submit separate admission applications to the College of Law and to the MPA Program. Each program has its own independent admissions standards, and admission to one program does not ensure admission to the other.

Applicants interested in pursuing the JD/MPA dual degree are encouraged to apply to both programs at the same time. Nonetheless, a law student may apply to the MPA program (and thus be eligible to earn a dual degree) prior to completion of the first year of law school. As noted in § c. below, an MPA student who enrolls in the law program after matriculating in the MPA program will have limitations imposed on those MPA credit hours that can count towards the law degree.

  • Completion of First Year at the College of Law as Prerequisite for Law Credit for MPA Courses

The College of Law will not give law credit for an MPA course unless the applicant has first successfully completed the first year at the College of Law. This prerequisite means that applicants who start the dual degree program by doing work in the MPA program before completing the first year of law school must delay taking the specific MPA courses they intend to count towards their 12 hours of law credit until after they complete the first year of law school.

The College of Law strongly recommends that an applicant not take any MPA courses during the first year of law school. The first year of law school is demanding.

  • Enrollment in the JD/MPA Dual Degree Program and Appointment of Faculty Advisors in Both Programs

A student who has been admitted to both the JD and to the MPA programs and who wishes to pursue the dual degree program opportunity must file a Dual Degree Enrollment Form with the Registrar of each program. Upon filing this form and its being approved by the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs in the College of Law and the MPA Program Director in the Department of Political Science, a Faculty Advisor will be appointed in each program to assist the student in planning an overall program of study that takes advantage of the goals of the dual degree program.

  • Requirements for Cross Over Course Credit

To earn academic credit towards a law degree for coursework completed in the MPA program: 1) an MPA course must be pre-approved by the College of Law Faculty Advisor, and that approval must be indicated on the “Petition for Non-Law School/Dual Degree Credit” Form; 2)the course must be a graduate-level course; and 3) the student must receive a grade of 3.0 ("B") or higher in the course.

To earn academic credit towards the MPA degree for coursework completed in the College of Law: 1) the course may not be part of the law school's first-year curriculum with exception of Constitutional Law I; 2) the student must receive a grade of 2.7 (B-) or higher in the course; and 3) the course must address topics directly related to public law, public administration, or public policy. The student should consult with the MPA Director or MPA Program Manager for approval.

  • Notification to Associate Dean of Academic Affairs of Enrollment Only in MPA Courses

A student in the JD/MPA Dual Degree Program who during any semester is enrolled only in MPA courses shall notify the law school's Associate Dean of Academic Affairs of that fact.

  • Notification to MPA Program Manager of Enrollment Only in College of Law Courses

A student in the JD/MPA Program who during any semester is enrolled only in College of Law courses shall notify the MPA Program Manager of that fact.

  • MPA Major Research Paper or Thesis

The MPA program requires that a student complete a major research paper. A research paper completed in a College of Law course may satisfy the MPA major research paper requirement if the student's MPA Faculty Advisor determines that the paper meets the following requirements:

      • The paper written in the law course meets all criteria for a major research paper set by the MPA program in terms of length and significance;
      • The law school paper receives a grade of "B" or better; and
      • The subject matter of the paper has significance in the fields of both law and public administration.

In the event that a student in the MPA program chooses to write the optional master's thesis instead of a major research paper, the MPA program will appoint the student's College of Law Faculty Advisor as a member of the thesis committee.

  • College of Law Seminar Paper Requirement

The College of Law Seminar Writing Requirement will not be waived for students in the JD/MPA Dual Degree Program, and the MPA major research paper will not satisfy this law school requirement. (However, as noted in Section 8 above, in certain instances the College ofLaw seminar paper may satisfy the MPA major research requirement).

Though students enrolled in the dual program are encouraged to select a seminar at the College of Law that involves the subject matter of relevance to public administration, this is not required.

  • MPA Comprehensive Oral Examination

The MPA program requires that all dual degree students successfully complete a comprehensive oral examination during the last semester of their MPA coursework. The College of Law Faculty Advisor, or some other member of the College of Law faculty appointed by the College of Law's Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, will participate as an examiner in this examination.

  • Work at the College of Law Meeting Other MPA Requirements

In choosing the 12 credit hours taken in the law school that count toward completion of the required credit for the MPA degree:

      • The MPA program will accept Administrative Law LAW 7300 as satisfying the MPA core course requirement Political Science 6230 (Administrative Law).
      • The MPA program will accept Constitutional Law I LAW 6060 and ConstitutionalLaw II LAW 7410 as satisfying the MPA core course requirement Political Science 6220 (Constitutional Law M.P.A.). Because both courses are required for all students at the College of Law, in most cases these two courses will constitute six of the 12 credit hours taken at the College of Law that count toward fulfilling the MPA degree requirements.
      • MPA students who have not had adequate practical experience in public administration are required to complete an internship. Students in the dual degree program who are required to complete such an internship may fulfill the requirement in any of the following ways (whether for pay or for credit, but not for both) with the prior approval of the MPA Program Director:
        • Completion of a full-time summer internship (three months) with a governmental agency or non-profit organization; or
        • Completion of a full-time summer or semester legal clerkship with a public agency as part of a College of Law Clinical Program; or
        • Completion of some other internship or clinical course at the College of Law which the MPA Program Director determines to meet the requirement.
  • Completion of Both Programs Required for Award of Each Degree

A student enrolled in the JD/MPA Dual Degree Program, who wishes to count credits taken in one program toward fulfilling the degree in the other program, must complete all requirements of both programs before either degree will be awarded.

Juris Doctor/Master of Public Policy (MPP)

The S.J. Quinney College of Law and the College of Social and Behavioral Science Master of Public Policy program have adopted the following program to enable students to pursue both a JD degree and an MPP degree simultaneously.

  • Reduction in Overall Credit Requirement

The JD/MPP program is based on the assumption that, because there is complementary intellectual benefit from studying law and public policy in a coordinated program, a student enrolled in the dual degree program should be allowed to earn both degrees in less time and with a lower overall credit requirement than if that student enrolled in each school or program independently. Accordingly, students enrolled in the dual degree program may count up to nine credit hours of College of Law classwork toward fulfilling the 40 credit-hour requirements of the MPP degree and may count up to twelve credit hours of MPP classwork toward fulfilling the 90 credit-hour requirements of the JD degree. Upon completion of all requirements of both programs, the student earns two separate degrees, a JD degree awarded by the College of Law and an MPP degree awarded by the College of Social and Behavioral Science.

Because the overall credit requirements for both degrees are reduced by 21 credit hours, a student enrolled in the dual degree program can expect to complete the two degrees in approximately eight semesters of full-time study. However, as noted in § k. below, a student enrolled in the JD/MPP dual Degree Program must complete all JD and all MPP requirements before either degree will be awarded.

  • Application to the JD/MPP Dual Degree Program

Applicants interested in this program must submit separate admission applications to the College of Law and to the MPP Program. Each program has its own independent admissions standards, and admission to one program does not ensure admission to the other. However, each program will inform the other as soon as it learns that an existing or prospective student has applied for or matriculated in the other respective program.

Applicants interested in pursuing the JD/MPP dual degree are encouraged to apply to both programs at the same time. Nonetheless, a law student may apply to the MPP program (and thus be eligible to earn a dual degree) prior to completion of the first year of law school. As noted in § c. below, a MPP student who enrolls in the law program after matriculating in the MPP program will have limitations imposed on those MPP credit hours that can count towards the law degree.

  • Completion of First Year at the College of Law as Prerequisite for Law Credit for MPP Courses

The College of Law will not give law credit for a MPP course unless the applicant has first successfully completed the first year at the College of Law. This prerequisite means that applicants who start the dual degree program by doing work in the MPP program before completing the first year of law school must delay taking the specific MPP courses they intend to count towards their nine hours of law credit until after they complete the first year of law school.

  • Enrollment in the JD/MPP Dual Degree Program and Appointment of Faculty Advisors in Both Programs

A student who has been admitted to both the JD and to the MPP programs and who wishes to pursue the dual degree program opportunity must file a Dual Degree Enrollment Form with the Registrar of each program. Upon filing this form and its being approved by the Associate Dean for Student Affairs in the College of Law and the MPP Program Director, an Advisor will be appointed in the College of Law. This College of Law advisor and the MPP Program Manager will assist the student in planning an overall program of study that takes advantage of the goals of the dual degree program.

  • Requirements for Cross-Over Course Credit

To earn academic credit toward a law degree for coursework completed in the MPP program: 1)an MPP course must be pre-approved by the College of Law Advisor or be included in a list of pre-approved courses adopted by the College of Law’s Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, and that approval must be indicated on the “Petition for Non-Law School/Dual Degree Credit” Form; 2) the course must be a graduate-level course; and 3) the student must receive a grade of 3.0 (“B”) or higher in the course.

To earn academic credit towards the MPP degree for coursework completed in the College of Law: 1) the course may not be part of the law school’s first year curriculum 2) the student must receive a grade of 2.7 (“B-“) or higher in the course; and 3) the course must address topics directly related to public law or public policy. The student should consult with the MPP Director or MPP Program Manager for approval.

If a student withdraws from either program, only credits completed within the remaining program will count toward that degree, unless those credits are independently approved for credit according to otherwise applicable policies.

  • Notification to Associate Dean of Academic Affairs of Enrollment Only in MPP Courses

A student in the JD/MPP Dual Degree Program who during any semester is enrolled only in MPP courses shall notify the College of Law’s Associate Dean of Academic Affairs of that fact.

  • Notification to MPP Program Manager of Enrollment Only in College of Law Courses

A student in the JD/MPP Dual Degree Program who during any semester is enrolled only in College of Law courses shall notify the MPP Program Manager of that fact.

  • MPP Applied Policy Project

The MPP program requires that a student complete an Applied Policy Project. A project completed in a College of Law course may satisfy the MPP requirement if the student’s MPP Advisor determines that the paper meets the following requirements:

      • The paper written in the law course meets all criteria for an Applied Policy Project set by the MPP program in terms of length and significance;
      • The law school paper receives a grade of “B” or better; and
      • The subject matter of the paper has significance in the fields of both law and publicpolicy.
  • College of Law Seminar Writing Requirement

The College of Law Seminar Writing Requirement will not be waived for students in the JD/MPP Dual Degree Program. The MPP Applied Policy Project will not satisfy this law school requirement unless it is part of an approved integrated project described below.(However, as noted in § viii. above, in certain instances the College of Law seminar paper maysatisfy the MPP Applied Policy Project.)

Students enrolled in the JD/MPP Dual Degree Program are encouraged to select a seminar at the College of Law that involves subject matter of relevance to public policy, but it is not required.

  • Integrated Project

Students may meet both the MPP Applied Policy Project and the College of Law Seminar Writing Requirement by completing a single paper which is approved by and supervised jointly by one faculty member in the MPP program and one faculty member in the College of Law. That paper should integrate aspects of law and public policy as relevant to the student’s dual degree program, and must be submitted through enrollment in an approved College of Law seminar.

  • Completion of Both Programs Required for Award of Each Degree

A student enrolled in the JD/MPP Dual Degree Program, who wishes to count credits taken in one program toward fulfilling the degree in the other program, must complete all requirements of both programs before either degree will be awarded.

Juris Doctor/Master of Real Estate Development (MRED)

The S.J. Quinney College of Law and the David Eccles School of Business have adopted the following program to enable students to pursue both a JD degree and an MRED degree simultaneously.

  • Reduction in Overall Credit Requirement

The JD/MRED program is based on the assumption that, because there is complementary intellectual benefit from studying law and real estate in a coordinated program, a student enrolled in the dual degree program should be allowed to earn both degrees in less time and with a lower overall credit requirement than were that student enrolled in each school or program independently. Accordingly, students enrolled in the dual degree program may count up to 12 credit hours of College of Law class work towards fulfilling the 42 credit-hour requirement of the MRED degree, and may count up to 12 credit hours of MRED class work towards fulfilling the 90 credit-hour requirement of the JD degree. Upon completion of both programs, the student earns two separate degrees, a JD degree awarded by the College of Law and an MRED degree awarded by the School of Business. Tuition is due to the respective college from which credit is granted.

In order for the MRED Program to facilitate the reduction in overall credit requirements, the following courses, which total 12 credit hours, are waived for JD students enrolled in the JD/MRED program: (1) the Land Use Law course (3 credit hours); (2) the Due Diligence course (3 credit hours) and (3) six elective credit hours. Alternative courses may be waived with MRED program director approval.

Because the overall credit requirements for both degrees are reduced by 24 credit hours, a student enrolled in the dual degree program can expect to complete the two degrees in approximately 8 semesters of full-time study. However, as noted in Section iii. below, an MRED student who enrolls in the law program after matriculating in the MRED program will have limitations imposed on those MRED credit hours that can count towards the law degree.

  • Application to the JD/MRED Dual Degree Program.

Applicants interested in this program must submit separate admission applications to the College of Law and to the Business School. Each program has its own independent admissions standards, and admission to one program does not ensure admission to the other.

Applicants interested in pursuing the JD/MRED dual degree are encouraged to apply to both programs at the same time. Nonetheless, a law student may apply to the MRED program (and thus be eligible to earn a dual degree) prior to completion of the first year of law school. As noted in Section iii. below, an MRED student who enrolls in the law program after matriculating in the MRED program will have limitations imposed on those MRED credit hours that can count towards the law degree.

  • Completion of First Year at the College of Law as Prerequisite for Law Credit for MRED courses.

The College of Law will not give law credit for an MRED course unless the applicant has first successfully completed the first year at the College of Law. This prerequisite means that applicants who start the dual degree program by doing work in the MRED program before completing the first year of law school must delay taking the specific MRED courses they intend to count towards their 12 hours of law credit until after they complete the first year of law school. The College of Law strongly recommends that an applicant not take any MRED courses during the first year of law school. The first year of law school is demanding.

  • Enrollment in the JD/MRED Dual Degree Program and Appointment of Faculty Advisors in Both Programs.

A student who has been admitted to both the JD and MRED programs and who wishes to pursue the dual degree program opportunity must file a Dual Degree Enrollment Form with the Registrar of each program. Upon filing this form and its being approved by the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs in the College of Law and the MRED Program Director in the School of Business, an Advisor will be appointed in each program to assist the student in planning an overall program of study that takes advantage of the goals of the dual degree program.

  • Requirements for Cross-Over Course Credit.

To earn academic credit towards a law degree for coursework completed in the MRED program: (1) an MRED course must be pre-approved by the College of Law Faculty Advisor, and that approval must be indicated on the “Petition for Non-Law School/Dual Degree Credit” Form; and (2) the student must receive a grade of 3.0 (“B”) or higher in the course.

To earn academic credit towards the MRED degree for coursework completed in the College of Law: (1) the course may not be part of the law school’s first-year curriculum; (2) the student must receive a grade of 3.0 (“B”) or higher in the course; and (3) the course must be approved by the MRED Academic Advisor. A list of pre-approved law school courses follows.

Corporate Financial Transactions (loan documentation), Drafting Contracts, Business Organizations (deals with organization of different forms of business), Drafting – Real Estate, Business Planning, Real Estate Transactions and Finance, Federal Income Tax (cover depreciation, 1031, 1033, gains and losses from sale of property), Partnership Tax, Corporate Tax, Conservation Easements, Land Use Control, Outdoor Recreation Law, Environmental Law, Environmental Conflict Resolution, Environmental Practice (clinic), Trust & Estates, Estate Planning, Seminar-Takings, Water Law. This list is subject to change due to changes in curriculum and scheduling.

  • Notification to Associate Dean of Academic Affairs of Enrollment Only in MRED Courses

A student in the JD/MRED Dual Degree Program who during any semester is enrolled only in MRED courses shall notify the law school’s Associate Dean of Academic Affairs of that fact.

  • Notification to MRED program Advisor of Enrollment Only in College of Law Courses

A student in the JD/MRED Dual Degree Program who during any semester is enrolled only in College of Law courses shall notify the MRED Program Advisor of that fact.

  • College of Law Seminar Paper Requirement

The College of Law Seminar Writing Requirement will not be waived for students in the JD/MRED Dual Degree Program, and no MRED research paper or other work product willsatisfy this law school requirement.

  • Professional Projects Class

The MRED Program requires that every student complete the Professional Projects or Capstone class. This requirement will not be waived for students in the JD/MRED Dual Degree Program, and no JD research paper or other work product will satisfy this business school requirement.

  • Completion of Both Programs Required for Award of Each Degree

A student enrolled in the JD/MRED Dual Degree Program who wishes to count credits taken in one program toward fulfilling the degree in the other program, must complete all requirements of both programs before either degree will be awarded. In the event a student elects to pursue a single degree after being accepted into the dual degree program, both the law school and the business school must be notified and all of the requirements of the elected program must be met.

Juris Doctor/Master of Social Work (MSW)

The S.J. Quinney College of Law and the College of Social Work propose the following program to enable students to pursue both a JD degree and an MSW degree simultaneously.

  • Reduction in Overall Credit Requirement

The JD/MSW program is based on the premise that, because there is complementary intellectual benefit from studying law and social work in a coordinated program, a student enrolled in the dual degree program should be allowed to earn both degrees in less time and with a lower overall credit requirement than a student enrolled in each school or program independently. Accordingly, students enrolled in the dual degree program may count up to 12 credit hours of College of Law course work towards fulfilling the 60 credit-hour requirement of the MSW degree, and may count up to 12 credit hours of MSW course work towards fulfilling the 90 credit-hour requirement of the JD degree. Upon completion of both programs, the student earns two separate degrees, a JD degree awarded by the College of Law and an MSW degree awarded by the College of Social Work.

Because the overall credit requirements for both degrees may be reduced by up to 24 credit hours, a student enrolled in the dual degree program can expect to complete the two degrees in approximately eight semesters of full-time study. However, as noted in § 2.10 below, a student enrolled in the JD/MSW Dual Degree Program must complete all JD and all MSW requirements before either degree will be awarded.

  • Application to the JD/MSW Dual Degree Program

Applicants interested in this program must submit separate admission applications to the College of Law and to the College of Social Work. Each program has its own independent admissions standards, and admission to one program does not ensure admission to the other. However, each program may inform the other when it learns that a prospective student has been admitted to its program.

Applicants interested in pursuing the JD/MSW dual degree are encouraged to apply to both programs at the same time. Nonetheless, a law student may apply to the MSW program (and thus be eligible to earn a dual degree) prior to completion of the first year of law school. As noted in Section iii. below, an MSW student who enrolls in the law program after matriculating in the MSW program will have limitations imposed on those MSW credit hours that can count towards the law degree.

  • Completion of First Year at the College of Law as Prerequisite for Law Credit for MSW Courses

The College of Law will not give law credit for an MSW course unless the applicant has first successfully completed the first year at the College of Law. This prerequisite means that applicants who start the dual degree program by doing work in the MSW program before completing the first year of law school must delay taking the specific MSW courses they intend to count towards their 12 hours of law credit until after they complete the first year of law school.

  • Enrollment in the JD/MSW Dual Degree Program and Appointment of Faculty Advisors in Both Programs

A student who has been admitted to both the JD and to the MSW programs and who wishes to pursue the dual degree program opportunity must file a Dual Degree Enrollment Form with the Registrar of each program. Upon filing this form and its approval by the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs in the College of Law and the MSW Program Director in the College of Social Work, a Faculty Advisor will be appointed in each program to assist the student in planning an overall program of study that takes advantage of the goals of the dual degree program.

  • Requirements for Cross-Over Course Credit

To earn academic credit towards a law degree for coursework completed in the MSW program:

      • an MSW course must be pre-approved by the College of Law Faculty Advisor or be included in a list of pre-approved courses adopted by the College of Law’s Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, and that approval must be indicated on the “Petition for Non-Law School/Dual Degree Credit” Form;
      • the course must be a graduate-level course; and
      • the student must receive a grade of 3.0 (“B”) or higher in each course.

Pre-approved College of Social Work Courses that may be counted towards JD Requirements shall include up to four (4) credits for completion of the Social Work Advanced Field Practicum II, provided the practicum is completed in a pre-approved Law Clinic placement site and meets all requirements for the law school clinic and the MSW field placement.

To earn academic credit towards the MSW degree for coursework completed in the College of Law:

      • a College of Law course must be pre-approved by the College of Social Work FacultyAdvisor or be included in a list of pre-approved courses adopted by the College of SocialWork’s MSW Director, and that approval must be indicated on the “Petition for Non-LawSchool/Dual Degree Credit” Form;
      • the course must be a graduate level course; and
      • the student must receive a grade of 3.0 (“B”) or higher in each course.

In addition to the courses that are pre-approved under this provision, the following College of Law courses have been approved for MSW degree credit and can be substituted for MSW courses otherwise required for the MSW degree:

      • Administrative Law (LAW 7300) will exempt the student from the MSW requirement of Advanced Social Work Administration/Supervision (3 credits; SW 6132/42/52/62).
      • A College of Law seminar (LAW 7800) will exempt the student from the MSW requirement of Advanced Social Work Policy (3 credits; SW 6231/41/51/61) and AdvancedSocial Work Research II (2 credits; SW 6432/42/52/62). The student must coordinate with the College of Social Work Faculty Advisor to ensure that the College of Law seminar project includes a social policy research focus.

If a student withdraws from either program, only credits completed within the remaining program will count toward that degree. The remaining program may approve credit earned from courses taken in other colleges according to the remaining program’s otherwise applicable policies.

  • Notification to Associate Dean of Academic Affairs of Enrollment Only in MSW Courses.

A student in the JD/MSW Dual Degree Program who is enrolled only in MSW courses during any semester shall notify the law school’s Associate Dean of Academic Affairs.

  • Notification to MSW Program Manager of Enrollment Only in College of Law Courses

A student in the JD/MSW Program who is enrolled only in College of Law courses during any semester shall notify the MSW Program Manager.

  • MSW Major Research Paper or Thesis

The MSW program does not currently require that a student complete a major research paper. If such a paper is required in the future for completion of the MSW degree, a research paper completed in a College of Law seminar course or other directed research project or work product may satisfy the MSW major research paper requirement if the student’s MSW Faculty Advisor determines that the paper meets the following requirements:

      • The paper written in the College of Law seminar course (L 7800) meets all criteria for a major research paper set by the MSW program in terms of length and significance;
      • The law school paper receives a grade of “B” or better; and
      • The subject matter of the paper has significance in the fields of both law and social work.

If a student in the MSW program chooses to write a master’s thesis, the MSW program may appoint the student’s College of Law Faculty Advisor as a member of the thesis committee.

  •  College of Law Writing Requirement

The College of Law Seminar Writing Requirement will not be waived for students in the JD/MSW Dual Degree Program, and the MSW major research paper or other work product will not satisfy this law school requirement. (However, as noted in § viii. above, in certain instances the College of Law seminar paper may satisfy the MSW major research requirement.)

  • Completion of Both Programs Required for Award of Each Degree

A student enrolled in the JD/MSW Dual Degree Program who wishes to count credits taken in one program toward fulfilling the degree in the other program, must complete all requirements of both programs before either degree will be awarded.

  • MSW/JD Dual Degree Typical Curriculum and Timeline

A student completing courses as indicated below should be able to satisfy both degree requirements in four (4) years. The program will reduce approximately 24 credits (one full-time year) from completing a two-year MSW program and a three-year JD program separately.

Graduation requirements:

    • College of Social Work: 60 credits
    • College of Law: 90 credits

1st Year: College of Law First-year courses (31 credits)

2nd Year: College of Social Work foundation courses (including practicum) (30 credits)

3rd Year: Completion of Social Work 2nd year core requirements

Fall

SW 6431/41/51/61 - Advanced SW Research I (2 credits)

SW 6031/41/51/61 - Advanced SW Practice I (3 credits)

SW 652 - Advanced Field Placement I (4 credits)

Spring

SW 6032/42/52/62 - Advanced Practice II (3 credits)

SW 6522 Advanced Field Placement II (4 credits)

Completion of Constitutional Law II LAW 7410 in the College of Law

3rd and 4th Years

Completion of College of Law Advanced Legal Writing and Experiential Learning Requirements, Legal Profession LAW 7900, and completion of College of Law and Social Work electives.