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The Wallace Stegner Center 27th Annual Symposium & the Water & Tribes Initiative present

The Colorado River Compact: Navigating the Future

Thursday, March 17 - Friday, March 18, 2022

8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Convened by the Wallace Stegner Center for Land, Resources, and the Environment and the Water & Tribes Initiative | Colorado River Basin

Join in person at the S.J. Quinney College of Law Moot Courtroom (Level 6) or on Zoom.
13 hours Utah CLE (pending).

Zoom Day 1 Button  |  Zoom Day 2 Button  |  Q&A - Slido.com (enter #River)

Speaker Bios

Bob Adler

University of Utah S.J. Quinney College Of Law

Bob Adler

University of Utah S.J. Quinney College Of Law
Robert W. Adler is a Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Utah, S.J. Quinney College of Law. He recently stepped down after a six-year term as the Jefferson B. and Rita E. Fordham Dean. He teaches and writes in the areas of environmental law and water law. His books include Water Law: Concepts and Insights (Foundation Press 2017, with Craig and Hall); Modern Water Law: Private Property, Public Rights and Environmental Protection (Foundation Press, 2013, second edition 2018, with Craig and Hall); Restoring Colorado River Ecosystems: A Troubled Sense of Immensity (2007); Environmental Law: A Conceptual and Pragmatic Approach (with Driesen, 2007 and Driesen and Engel, second edition 2011, third edition 2016); and The Clean Water Act: Twenty Years Later (with Landman and Cameron, 1993). He has also written dozens of articles on various aspects of domestic and international environmental and water law and policy. Before coming to the College of Law in 1994, he practiced environmental law for 15 years at the Natural Resources Defense Council, Trustees for Alaska, and the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources.

Bidtah Becker

(Navajo Nation), California’s Environmental Protection Agency

Bidtah Becker

(Navajo Nation), California’s Environmental Protection Agency
Becker is one of the nation’s leading tribal water rights, energy and environmental justice practitioners. A member of the Navajo Nation, she has served as the head of the Navajo Nation Division of Natural Resources, overseeing 12 departments including agriculture, parks, forestry, land development, mine remediation, archaeological and cultural resources, and water resources, with a staff of more than 500. She is currently with the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority, where she was instrumental in advancing the development of the Navajo Gallup Water Supply Project, a $1.5 billion project that will provide clean, reliable water to tribal and rural communities.

John Berggren

Western Resource Advocates

John Berggren

Western Resource Advocates
John Berggren is a Water Policy Analyst for Western Resource Advocates, where he works to advance water conservation and efficiency policies at the state and local levels by engaging with municipalities, water managers, state officials, and other stakeholders throughout the region. Much of this work is at the intersection of water and land use planning with the hopes of helping communities become as water efficient as possible. John serves on the City of Boulder’s Water Resources Advisory Board, is a member of the Colorado Water and Land Use Planning Alliance, and is certified as a Qualified Water Efficient Landscaper (QWEL). He has a PhD in Environmental Studies and Water Policy from the University of Colorado at Boulder, a MHS degree in Environmental Health Sciences from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and a BA in Public Health from Johns Hopkins University.

Tom Buschatzke

Arizona Department of Water Resources

Tom Buschatzke

Arizona Department of Water Resources
Tom Buschatzke was appointed Director of the Arizona Department of Water Resources in January 2015. With over four decades of water management experience, he is responsible for carrying out ADWR’s mission: To safeguard the health, safety and economic welfare of the public by protecting, conserving and enhancing Arizona's water supplies in a bold, thoughtful and innovative manner. Mr. Buschatzke serves as Arizona’s principal negotiator on matters relating to the Colorado River, and chairs both the Arizona Water Banking Authority and the Governor’s Water Augmentation, Innovation and Conservation Council. He represents the State in Indian water right negotiations. In addition, he is the U.S. representative to the Binational Desalination Work Group, which is charged with exploring desalination opportunities with the Republic of Mexico. Prior to his appointment as ADWR Director, he served for 23 years with the City of Phoenix, ultimately as the Water Resources Management Advisor, responsible for policy development. He has served on the Board of Directors of the Western Urban Water Coalition and a Chair of the Coalition’s Endangered Species Act Committee. He was previously a Commissioner on the Arizona Water Banking Authority and the Arizona Water Protection Fund.

Anne Castle

University of Colorado Law School

Anne Castle

University of Colorado Law School
Anne Castle is a Senior Fellow at the Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources at the University of Colorado, focusing on western water issues including Colorado River operational policy and the integration of tribal water interests. She is a founding member of the Water Policy Group. From 2009 to 2014, she was Assistant Secretary for Water and Science at the U.S. Department of the Interior where she oversaw water and science policy for the Department and had responsibility for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and the U.S. Geological Survey. While at Interior, Castle spearheaded the Department’s WaterSMART program and provided hands-on leadership on Colorado River issues including a ground-breaking agreement between the US and Mexico. She is the President of the Board of Directors of the Colorado Water Trust, and serves on several boards or advisory committees including Western Resource Advocates, Airborne Snow Observatory, Stanford University’s Water in the West program, and the Colorado River Water and Tribes Initiative, where she is co-leading an initiative on universal access to water on Indian reservations.

Larry Cesspooch

Ute Indian Tribe

Larry Cesspooch

Ute Indian Tribe

John Entsminger

Las Vegas Valley Water District and Southern Nevada Water Authority

John Entsminger

Las Vegas Valley Water District and Southern Nevada Water Authority
John Entsminger is the general manager of the Las Vegas Valley Water District, which serves over 410,000 customer accounts, and the Southern Nevada Water Authority, which is responsible for providing water to local agencies that collectively serve 2 million residents and 40 million annual visitors. Entsminger was instrumental in the development of several groundbreaking regional and international water agreements. He has been appointed by Nevada’s governor to serve as the state’s lead negotiator on Colorado River matters. Entsminger is Vice President of the Association of Metropolitan Water Agencies and is a trustee of the Water Research Foundation and the Desert Research Institute Foundation.

John Fleck

University of New Mexico School of Law

John Fleck

University of New Mexico School of Law
John Fleck, a former science journalist, is Writer in Residence at the Utton Center, University of New Mexico School of Law; and Professor of Practice in Water Policy and Governance in the University of New Mexico Department of Economics. He is the author of Water is For Fighting Over and Other Myths About Water in the Westand co-author, with Eric Kuhn, of Science Be Dammed: How Ignoring Inconvenient Science Drained the Colorado River. He is working with Bob Berrenson a new book –Ribbons of Green: The Rio Grande and the Making of a Modern American City.

Amy Haas

Colorado River Authority of Utah

Amy Haas

Colorado River Authority of Utah
Amy I. Haas is the first Executive Director of the newly formed Colorado River Authority of Utah (“Authority”). Previously, Amy worked as the Executive Director and General Counsel for the Upper Colorado River Commission. Before joining Commission staff, Amy was both General Counsel and Acting Director of the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission. From March 2015 through May 2017, Amy served as New Mexico’s Upper Colorado River Commissioner and its Colorado River Basin States Principal. Amy began her career in New Mexico over two decades ago as an attorney in private practice, concentrating on water and land use law.

Chris Harris

Colorado River Board of California

Chris Harris

Colorado River Board of California

Jason Hauter

(Gila River Indian Community), Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Fled LLP

Jason Hauter

(Gila River Indian Community), Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Fled LLP
Jason Hauter advises clients regarding American Indian law and policy. Jason primarily represents Indian tribes and tribally owned enterprises, advising on a variety of matters, including: federal policy, Indian water rights, Indian gaming, land into trust, economic development, and environmental regulation. For eight years, Jason served as in-house counsel for the Gila River Indian Community, of which he is an enrolled member, in Arizona. He advised on many issues, including economic development, construction, labor and Indian employment preference, taxation and internal policy. Jason received his B.A. in communications in 1999 from the University of Washington-Seattle. He received his J.D. in 2002 from the University of New Mexico School Of Law, where he was a founding member and an editor of the Tribal Law Journal.

Osvel Hinojosa-Huerta

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Osvel Hinojosa-Huerta

Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Osvel Hinojosa-Huerta has been working in conservation and research projects in northwestern Mexico since 1997. He was the Director of the Water and Wetlands Program for Pronatura Noroeste in Mexico, where he led the efforts to restore the Colorado River delta for over 20years, including the restoration of river flows and the facilitation of binational negotiations between Mexico and the US. Currently, he is the Director of the Coastal Solutions Fellowship Program at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, where he is working to protect threatened coastal habitats along the Pacific Flyway from Mexico to Chile.In 2009 he received the National Award for the Conservation of Wetlands in Mexico, in 2012 he received the Emerging Explorer Award from the National Geographic Society, and in 2014 he received the Sonoran Desert Conservation Award.He obtained a BSc in Biochemical Engineering and Marine Sciences from ITESM Campus Guaymas and a Ph.D.in Wildlife and Fisheries Science from the University of Arizona.

Kathy Jacobs

The University of Arizona

Kathy Jacobs

The University of Arizona
Kathy Jacobs is a professor of Environmental Science at the University of Arizona and Director of the Center for Climate Adaptation Science and Solutions (CCASS). CCASS is a component of the Arizona Institutes for Resilience, and builds capacity to accelerate adaptation and on-the-ground solutions to climate issues. From 2010 –2013, Jacobs worked in the Office of Science and Technology Policy in the White House. She was director of the Third National Climate Assessment, and the lead advisor on water science, policy, and adaptation. From 2006-2009 Jacobs was Executive Director of the Arizona Water Institute, a consortium of Arizona’s three universities focused on water sustainability. She worked 23 years for the Arizona Department of Water Resources, including 15 as the director of the Tucson Active Management Area. She was engaged in multiple aspects of implementing Arizona’s Groundwater Management Act, including development of water conservation programs and the Assured Water Supply Rules. Jacobs earned her M.L.A. in environmental planning from Berkeley.

Carly Jerla

U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

Carly Jerla

U.S. Bureau of Reclamation
Carly Jerla is a senior water resources program manager with the Bureau of Reclamation. She was recently selected to lead the development of the updated operating rules for Lake Powell and Lake Mead. She is currently stationed at the University of Colorado's Center for Advanced Decision Support for Water and Environmental Systems (CU-CADSWES) alongside Reclamation's Upper and Lower Colorado River Basin Regions' research, planning, and modeling teams. She is a graduate of Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Colorado.

Bob Keiter

University of Utah S.J. Quinney College Of Law

Bob Keiter

University of Utah S.J. Quinney College Of Law
Professor Keiter holds a J.D. degree with honors from Northwestern University School of Law and a B.A. with honors from Washington University. He has taught at the University of Wyoming, Boston College, and Southwestern University, and served as a Senior Fulbright Scholar at Tribhuvan University in Kathmandu, Nepal. Professor Keiter's most recent books are To Conserve Unimpaired: The Evolution of the National Park Idea, (Island Press, April 2013), and the Wyoming State Constitution (Oxford University Press, 2017). His other books include Keeping Faith With Nature: Ecosystems, Democracy, and America's Public Lands (Yale Univ. Press 2003); Reclaiming the Native Home of Hope: Community, Ecology, and the West (Univ. of Utah Press 1998); Visions of the Grand Staircase-Escalante: Examining Utah's Newest National Monument (Utah Mus. of Nat. History & Wallace Stegner Center 1998); The Wyoming State Constitution: A Reference Guide (Greenwood Press 1993); and The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem: Redefining America's Wilderness Heritage (Yale Univ. Press 1991). He has also written numerous book chapters and journal articles on public lands and natural resource law, addressing such topics as national parks, ecosystem management, wildfire policy, and biodiversity conservation. He serves as a Trustee of the National Parks Conservation Association and the Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Foundation, for which he served as President from 2013-2014. Professor Keiter teaches Natural Resources Law and Constitutional Law. He has received teaching awards from the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law, the University of Wyoming College of Law, and the Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Foundation. In 2008, he was named a University Distinguished Professor by the University of Utah. His current project is an update of his previous work on the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

Patrick Kikut

University of Wyoming

Patrick Kikut

University of Wyoming
Patrick Kikut (b. 1967)earned a BFA from University of Colorado and an MFA in 1994 from the University of Montana. Although he is primarily an oil painter, he has worked (and exhibited) in a diverse range of media. Since 2005, Kikut has been living, painting and teaching at the University of Wyoming. In 2019 he served as the Lead Artist on the 1000 mile Sesquicentennial Colorado River Exploring Expedition (SCREE). His work has been shown internationally and nationally and has been an artist in residence at Ucross Foundation, Center for Land Art and Interpretation, and Polli Talu in Estonia. His work is included in numerous collections including the El Paso Museum of Art, The Missoula Art Museum, The Nicolaysen Museum, and the University of Wyoming.

Eric Kuhn

The Colorado River Water Conservation District

Eric Kuhn

The Colorado River Water Conservation District
Eric Kuhn is the retired General Manager of the Colorado River Water Conservation District and co-author with John Fleck of Science Be Dammed: How Ignoring Inconvenient Science Drained the Colorado River, University of Arizona Press, 2019. Eric started employment with the Colorado River District in 1981 as Assistant Secretary-Engineer. In 1996 he was appointed General Manager, a position he held until his retirement in 2018. Eric and John’s book, Science Be Dammed,is about Colorado River hydrology, what we knew, when we knew it,and how we used it to shape the over-allocation of the river under the 1922 compact, the other major provisions of the law-of-the-river, and the projects we have in place today.

Lawrence J. MacDonnell

University of Colorado Law School

Lawrence J. MacDonnell

University of Colorado Law School
Lawrence J. MacDonnell is an attorney and consultant in Boulder who retired in 2013 as a professor of law at the University of Wyoming College of Law where he taught water law, public land law, and natural resources law. He is also a senior fellow at the Getches-Wilkinson Center at the University of Colorado School of Law.He was the first director of the predecessor Natural Resources Law Center, a position he held between 1983 and 1994. Between 1995 and 2009 he worked as an attorney and consultant in Boulder, Colorado. His work focused primarily on water resources and on ways to make land and natural resource development more environmentally compatible.His publications includenumerousbooks, law review articles, other journal articles, and researchreports. He has given over250invited presentations.He is married, with three daughters.

Enrique B. Martinez

Imperial Irrigation District

Enrique B. Martinez

Imperial Irrigation District
Enrique B. Martinez serves as Imperial Irrigation District’s chief executive, managing one of the largest irrigation districts in the country and the third largest public power provider in the state.Leading a workforce of about 1,400 employees, his focus as general manager is to chart a course to take IID where it needs to be in the 21st century. Prior to his role as general manager he led IID’s Energy Department for six months. Mr. Martinez has more than 45 years of experience in the utility sector, assuming ever-increasing levels of responsibility in executive/senior level leadership of administrative, technical and field organizations. His tenure includes nearly 25 years with Southern California Edison, 10 years with the Los Angeles Department of Water & Power and seven years with the Tennessee Valley Authority.Prior to his work at IID, he served as a senior vice president with Cordoba Corporation, a diversified engineering firm where he headed up business development and client management, developing the corporation’s presence in the water infrastructure industry. His experience includes work on several unique public projects. He was executive/principal-in-charge on the City of Industry Public Utilities Commission project and capital improvement program and led efforts on projects sponsored by the City of Los Angeles, Department of Sanitation. He also oversaw work in support of the LADWP’s Owens Lake dust monitoring and compliance program.While at LADWP, he served six months as interim general manager and was chief operating officer of the electrical system.At Edison International/Southern California Edison, Mr. Martinez served as vice president of power production, VP of safety, security and compliance, director of strategic planning, director of grid operations and in various senior management positions in electric plant operations.While at the Tennessee Valley Authority, he served as vice president of hydro operations where he was responsible for 29 power plants and more than 40 main and diversion dams.He holds a bachelor’s degree in engineering from California State University, Fullerton, and has completed executive training programs at Pepperdine University and the University of Virginia.

Amy McCoy

AMP Insights

Amy McCoy

AMP Insights
Amy McCoy is a partner at AMP Insights, where she pursues dynamic collaborations to examine and respond to water and climate challenges from the perspective of science, society, and policy. She also serves an Adjunct Research Scientist with the University of Arizona Southwest Center and participates in ecological and water security research collaborations. She has previously worked as partner at Martin & McCoy, as an ecologist with the Sonoran Institute, and was a Captain and athlete in the US Air Force. She graduated with a BS in Environmental Biology from Yale University, an MA in Environmental Studies from the University of Southern California, and a PhD in Arid Lands Resource Sciences from the University of Arizona.

Nora McDowell

(Fort Mojave Indian Tribe), Pipa AhaMakav Cultural Center

Nora McDowell

(Fort Mojave Indian Tribe), Pipa AhaMakav Cultural Center
Nora McDowell is an enrolled member of the Fort Mojave Indian Tribe. She serves as the Project Manager for the AhaMakav Cultural Society, a division of the Fort Mojave Indian Tribe. Her primary role is to oversee the Topock Project site, which is a hazardous waste cleanup of Hexavalent Chromium VI along the Colorado River, 13 miles east of Needles, CA, this particular site is within ancestral homelands of the AhaMakav, "People of the River," and is considered a Sacred site of the Mojave people. Nora was the former Chairperson of the Fort Mojave Indian Tribe for over 25+ years, was instrumental in the formation of the 10 Tribes Partnership, Aha Macav Power Services, Fort Mojave Telecommunications Inc., Fort Mojave Tribal Utility Authority, and served as the Chairperson of the Inter Tribal Council of Arizona, Member of Council of Energy Resource Tribes, Native American Rights Fund, National Tribal Telecom Association and a Founding Member of WEWIN, Women Empowering Women for Indian Nations. Her passion is the protection of all natural resources, cultural, religious, spiritual and environmental sites along the Colorado River and other areas that deserve advocacy and protection.

Matthew McKinney

The University of Montana

Matthew McKinney

The University of Montana
Matthew McKinney is the Director of the Center for Natural Resources & Environmental Policy at the University of Montana. For the past five years, he has co-facilitated the Water & Tribes Initiative, an ad hoc partnership among tribal and other leaders in the Colorado River Basin to enhance tribal capacity and support collaborative problem-solving. Matthew has over 30 years of experience as a facilitator, mediator, policy analyst, and educator. He has worked on water, public land, and many related issues throughout the American West, as well as in Canada, Mongolia, Turkey, India, Middle East, Australia, and several European countries. In addition to working on place-based and policy-oriented projects,Matt has provided leadership in designing a number of collaborative networks, partnerships, and organizations; co-chairs the University of Montana’s Natural Resources Conflict Resolution Program; and publishes in various law reviews and other journals. When he is not working, he can be found hiking, biking, fly-fishing, floating, skiing, and otherwise enjoying Montana and the public lands of the American West with his wife, three daughters, and three grandchildren.

Becky Mitchell

Colorado Water Conservation Board

Becky Mitchell

Colorado Water Conservation Board
Rebecca Mitchell (Becky) serves as the Director of the Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB) as well as the Colorado Commissioner to the Upper Colorado River Commission. She is an accomplished water leader with over 20 years of experience in the water sector and highly knowledgeable in Colorado water law. Mitchell played a significant role in developing the Colorado Water Plan, working with the state’s nine basin roundtables, the Interbasin Compact Committee, and the public. She has worked in both the public and private sector as a consulting engineer; she received both her B.S. and M.S. from the Colorado School of Mines.

Andy Mueller

Colorado River Water Conservation District

Andy Mueller

Colorado River Water Conservation District
Andy Mueller is the General Manager of the Colorado River Water Conservation District. Prior to taking the helm at the Colorado River District he spent 23 years in private law practice on the West Slope of Colorado. His work ranged across the breadth of critical western Colorado topics: water, natural resource, land use and community issues. For nine years from 2006‐15, he was Ouray County’s Director on the Colorado River District Board, his last two as Board President. His combined experience prepared him to lead the River District, whose work is to lead in the protection, conservation, use and development of the waters of the Colorado River for the residents of the West Slope and to safeguard for all of Colorado all waters of the Colorado River to which the state is entitled. Andy earned his law degree from University of Colorado in 1995 after earning his BA in history from Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio. When he is not delving deep into Colorado River issues or spending time outdoors with his daughters, he is actively engaged with his community, serving on the local Habitat for Humanity Board and the local Parks and Recreation Commission.

David Palumbo

Bureau of Reclamation

David Palumbo

Bureau of Reclamation
David Palumbo is the Bureau of Reclamation's Deputy Commissioner of Operations. In that role he has leadership accountability for the environmentally and economically sound delivery of water and power to the 17 western states served by Reclamation. David oversees operations in Reclamation's five regions, the Native American and International Affairs Office, and the Chief Engineer Directorate, which manages the Technical Service Center, Hydropower Office, Dam Safety and Infrastructure Office, and Research & Development Office. Prior to his current position, David served as the Deputy Regional Director in Reclamation's Lower Colorado Region. In this role he oversaw complex water and power programs, including Hoover Dam operations, and led Native American activities related to fulfilling Tribal trust responsibilities and implementing Indian water rights settlements. David joined Reclamation in 2005 and has held a variety of leadership positions. Working collaboratively with water users, power contractors, Tribal nations, non-governmental organizations, and international partners, he has been responsible for multiple water and power resource management, conservation, drought resiliency, and climate change adaptation and mitigation focused projects and programs. Prior to joining Reclamation, David worked in the private sector managing engineering and operations for manufacturing, water, energy, and research and development programs, including a joint venture with Canada's Hydro-Quebec. He has received two of the Department of the Interior's highest honors for career employees, as well as Presidential Rank Award, and was selected as Reclamation's Engineer of the Year in 2008. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and a Master of Science in Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics from Columbia University. He also earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in English Literature from the University of Notre Dame and a Master of Arts degree in English Literature from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He is a licensed professional civil engineer in California and a certified project management professional.

Carlos A. de la Parra

Restauremos el Colorado

Carlos A. de la Parra

Restauremos el Colorado
A Mexican scholar and government advisor whose work and research has focused on environmental policy and water management on the U.S.-Mexico border. Holds a PhD in Environmental Planning from the University of Michigan and has held positions in Mexico’s Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources (SEMARNAT) in Baja California and at the Mexican Embassy in Washington. He represents Restauremos el Colorado, a non-profit that manages water for ecosystem restoration in Mexicali, Baja California, and is Mexico’s Civil Society Representative on the Board of Directors for the North American Development Bank (NADB).

Jennifer Pitt

National Audubon Society

Jennifer Pitt

National Audubon Society
Jennifer Pitt advises Audubon’s strategies to protect and restore rivers throughout the Colorado River Basin. Since 2013 she has been the US co-lead for the United States–Mexico collaboration to restore the long-desiccated Colorado River Delta. She serves as the U.S. co-chair of the bi-national work group whose partners will, through 2026, implement existing treaty commitments providing environmental flows and habitat creation.

James Prairie

U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

James Prairie

U.S. Bureau of Reclamation
James Prairie, Ph.D.is a Hydrologic Engineer working for Reclamation’s Upper Colorado Basin Region since 2000. He is the region’s Research and Modeling Team lead stationed at the University of Colorado’s Center for Advanced Decision Support for Water and Environmental Systems (CADSWES). Dr. Prairie leads applied research in short and mid-term operations and long-term water resource planning, climate variability, and decision support under uncertainty. He directs river basin modeling technical teams; and oversees the consumptive use, natural flow and natural salinity development programs for the Upper Colorado River basin.Dr. Prairie received his Ph.D.in Civil Engineering for the University of Colorado, Boulder and a B.S.in Environmental Resource Engineering from the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry.

Jason Robison

University of Wyoming College of Law

Jason Robison

University of Wyoming College of Law
Jason Robison is a professor in the University of Wyoming College of Law's Environmental, Energy & Natural Resources program. He is the editor of the Colorado River Compact centennial volume, Cornerstone: The Next Century of the Colorado River Compact (Univ. of Ariz. Press, forthcoming 2022); the lead editor of the 1869 Powell Expedition sesquicentennial volume, Vision & Place: John Wesley Powell & Reimagining the Colorado River Basin (Univ. of Cal. Press, 2020); and the author of the long-running treatise, Law of Water Rights & Resources (Thomson Reuters, 2021). Jason is honored to serve as Chair of the Colorado River Research Group and as a member of the Leadership Team for the Water & Tribes Initiative. He also had the privilege of serving on the steering committee for the Sesquicentennial Colorado River Exploring Expedition that retraced the 1869 Powell Expedition's epic voyage during summer 2019.

John Ruple

University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law

John Ruple

University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law
John Ruple is a Research Professor of Law and Stegner Center Fellow at the Wallace Stegner Center for Land Resources and the Environment where he works on public lands and water resource management. John’s current research focuses on improving National Environmental Policy Act efficacy, national monument designation and management, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions from oil and gas development.Prior to joining the Stegner Center, John was a Fellow with the University’s Institute for Clean and Secure Energy where he researched land and water issues involving energy development in Utah’s Uinta Basin. Before joining the University of Utah in 2008, John worked as policy analyst in Governor Jon Huntsman’s Public Lands Office, as an environmental attorney in private practice, and as a NEPA contractor specializing in permitting for projects on National Forest System lands. His work has published widely, including in nine book chapters, and articles in the Harvard Environmental Law Review, the Columbia Environmental Law Journal, the Georgetown Environmental Law Review, and Environmental Law. He is lead or contributing author on eleven government reports and fifteen environmental impact statements and environmental assessments.

Roberto F. Salmon Castelo

ROSAL Consulting

Roberto F. Salmon Castelo

ROSAL Consulting
Roberto F. Salmon Castelo served from April 2009 until May 2020 as the Mexican Commissioner for the International Boundary and Water Commission (IBWC) and has a solid experience in the field of international negotiations related to water and boundary issues between Mexico and the United States. In this capacity, he led the Mexican team that accomplished the signing of 11 binational agreements (Minutes) with the United States, which are binding for both countries.From 2002 to 2006 and from 2006 until 2009, he worked for the Mexican National Water Commission (CONAGUA), first as the Northwest Regional Manager and later as the General Director of the Northwest Basin Region, based in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico, from where he oversaw all affairs related to water resources. Mr. Salmon served as the Planning and Special Projects Director for the Center for Research and Development of Natural Resources (CIDESON) of the State of Sonora, and he also started a consulting company oriented to surface and groundwater as well as environmental studies and projects.He also has vast experience in financial projects and has served as the Director of Budget and Planning, and later as the Chief Financial Officer at the University of Sonora as well as on other private entities. He is also a founding partner in three financial enterprises in the State of Sonora.Mr. Salmon has participated as a leading consultant in a large number of projects on a wide range of subjects, such as water resources, plant location, financial engineering, statistics, economic feasibility, agriculture, and strategic planning. And on the academic sector, he has also served as professor at the Instituto Tecnologico de Sonora, University of Sonora, Instituto Tecnológico de Monterrey (Campus Guadalajara and Obregón), as well as teaching and research assistant at the University of Arizona in the departments of Agricultural Economics and Hydrology and Water Resources.He has authored or co-authored several articles related to water resources, and US-Mexico transboundary water management; and has been a speaker on several conferences both binationally and internationally.

Jack Schmidt

Utah State University

Jack Schmidt

Utah State University
Jack Schmidt has contributed more than 35 years of professional life to the study and management of the Colorado River. He has worked with graduate students, faculty colleagues, agency scientists and staff, and policy leaders to understand the processes of the Colorado River, the historical transformation of the river, and how river resources might be better managed. Between 2011 and 2014, he served as Chief of the USGS Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center. He has won awards from the National Park Service and the Secretary of Interior for his contributions to river science and management.

Tina Shields

Imperial Irrigation District’s Water Department

Tina Shields

Imperial Irrigation District’s Water Department
Tina Shields has served as the Imperial Irrigation District’s Water Department manager since 2014, where she focuses on Colorado River resources, planning, water conservation and management functions. She oversees IID’s Colorado River water supply entitlement with a focus on the implementation of water management policies and the coordination of various water conservation and transfer programs. Ms. Shields represents the district’s water interests at local, state and federal levels –protecting IID’s senior water rights and its annual 3.1 million acre-foot allocation of Colorado River water. She has directed the district in a wide range of issues related to water rights, supply and demand planning, resource management, water quality, regulatory compliance and water conservation during her nearly 30-year tenure at IID. A registered civil engineer in the state of California, Ms. Shields provides technical guidance and recommendations for IID’s water issues and oversees its implementation of the Quantification Settlement Agreement, a historic pact that set in motion the largest ag-to-urban water conservation and transfer agreement in the United States and serves as the foundation of California’s ability to live within its 4.4 million acre-foot annual apportionment of Colorado River water.

Heather Tanana

(Navajo Nation), University of Utah S.J. Quinney College Of Law

Heather Tanana

(Navajo Nation), University of Utah S.J. Quinney College Of Law
Heather Tanana, JD, MPH (Diné) is an Assistant Professor (Research) & Wallace Stegner Center Fellow at the S.J. Quinney College of Law. Heather is experienced in state, federal, and tribal courts and clerked at the U.S. District Court for the District of Utah. She also founded the Indian Law Section of the Utah State Bar Association. In recognition of her work related to Tribal communities, the environment, and public health, Heather has received recognition and awards from the Natural Resources & Environmental Law Section of the Utah State bar, the Utah Minority Bar Association, and the Environment, Energy, and Resources Section of the American Bar Association. Heather is also Associate Faculty at the Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health, where she works with the Center’s Training team on developing and teaching Institute courses and collaborates on health policy related work. She holds a Master of Public Health from the Bloomberg School of Public Health - Johns Hopkins University, where she was inducted into the Delta Omega Public Health Honorary Society. Heather’s research interests include exploring the overlay between environmental and health policy, promoting better practices in Indian child welfare, and criminal justice in Indian Country. She chairs the Indian Child Welfare Act Committee of the Indian Law Section. She is also part of the Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Foundation Diversity and Inclusion Task Force and serves as Chair on the Board of Directors of the Urban Indian Center of Salt Lake.

Tanya Trujillo

Assistant Secretary for Water and Science, U.S. Department of the Interior

Tanya Trujillo

Assistant Secretary for Water and Science, U.S. Department of the Interior
Tanya Trujillo is a water lawyer with more than 20 years of experience working on complex natural resources management issues and interstate and transboundary water agreements. She most recently worked as a project director with the Colorado River Sustainability Campaign. Before then, she served as the Executive Director of the Colorado River Board of California. She has served as Senior Counsel to the U.S. Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee and as Counselor to the Assistant Secretary for Water and Science at Interior. A native New Mexican, Tanya attended Stanford University and the University of Iowa College of Law.

Crystal Tulley-Cordovais

(Navajo Nation), Navajo Nation Department of Water Resources

Crystal Tulley-Cordovais

(Navajo Nation), Navajo Nation Department of Water Resources
Crystal Tulley-Cordovais a Principal Hydrologist in the Navajo Nation Department of Water Resources –Water Management Branch.She has worked collaboratively with Navajo Nation partners on water-related research since 2013. Her work pre-pandemic focused on protecting and managing water resources in the Navajo Nation; since the start of the pandemic, herwork focused on providing more safewater access for Navajo residents has increased. She has a Ph.D. in Geology and InterdisciplinaryGraduateCertificate in Sustainabilityfromthe University of Utah and a Master of Water Resources in Hydroscience and Bachelor of Science in Earth and Planetary Sciences from the University of New Mexico.

Bradley H. Udall

Colorado State University, Colorado Water Center

Bradley H. Udall

Colorado State University, Colorado Water Center
Bradley H. Udall is a Senior Water and Climate Research Scientist / Scholar at Colorado State University’s Colorado Water Center. His expertise includes hydrology and related policy issues of the American West, with a focus on the Colorado River.  Brad was a co-author of the 2009 and 2019 National Climate Assessments and a contributing author to the 2014 IPCC 5th Assessment. Brad has testified in both the U.S. Senate and U.S. House of Representatives on the impacts of climate change of water resources.  He has written on the causes of the declining Colorado River flows and on the ongoing aridification of the Western US. Brad has an engineering degree from Stanford and an MBA from Colorado State University. 

Margaret J. Vick

Colorado River Indian Tribes

Margaret J. Vick

Colorado River Indian Tribes
Margaret J. Vick has more than 30 years of experience working with and advising Native American Tribes and tribal organizations in the Western United States.Dr. Vick served as an embedded advisor for USAID with the Ministry of Energy and Water for the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan.She has a doctorate of juridical sciences in the law of international water resources from University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law and works with all levels of government on complex water allocation and management issues. She specializes in cross-jurisdictional negotiations and brings a wide range of expertise and a broad perspective to issues of water use and governance.She is a frequent speaker on Colorado River issues and an adjunct professor at McGeorge School of Law teaching the law of international water resources in their Masters in Science and Law program.

Daryl Vigil

(Jicarilla Apache Nation/Jemez Pueblo/Zia Pueblo), Water & Tribes Initiative

Daryl Vigil

(Jicarilla Apache Nation/Jemez Pueblo/Zia Pueblo), Water & Tribes Initiative
Jicarilla Apache Nation (enrolled), Jemez Pueblo, Zia Pueblo, currently, the Water Administrator for the Jicarilla Apache Nation, Co-facilitator Water & Tribes Initiative, currently member of Board of Trustees for the Colorado River Water Users Association, the past Chairman of the Colorado River Ten Tribes Partnership, the past Interim Executive Director and official spokesperson for the Ten Tribes Partnership, member of the Coordination Committee of the San Juan River Recovery and Restoration Project, past Secretary/Treasurer of the Colorado River Water Users Association, past Chairman of the Board of the Jicarilla Apache Utility Authority, and the past President/CEO of the Apache Nugget Corporation the Jicarilla Apache Nation’s Gaming Enterprise.

Elizabeth Kronk Warner

(Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians), University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law

Elizabeth Kronk Warner

(Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians), University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law
Elizabeth Kronk Warner is Dean and Professor of Law at the S.J. Quinney College of Law at the University of Utah. She was formerly Associate Dean and Professor of Law at the University of Kansas School of Law (KU), where she was also the Director of the Tribal Law and Government Center. Dean Kronk Warner is a nationally recognized expert in the intersection of Environmental and Indian law. She has taught courses in Property, Indian, Environmental and Natural Resources Law, and supervised the KU Tribal Judicial Support Clinic. She has received several teaching excellence awards, co-authored several books on environmental issues and Native Americans, and has over 40 articles and book chapters to her credit. Dean Kronk Warner, a citizen of the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, served as an appellate judge for the tribe and as a district judge for the Prairie Band Potawatomi Tribe. Dean Kronk Warner previously was an active member of the Federal Bar Association, serving on its national Board of Directors. In 2014, she received the Federal Bar Association President’s Award for leadership and extraordinary service, commitment, and guidance to the Federal Bar Association and its members. She is currently active in the American Bar Association, where she is co-chaired of the Native American Resources Committee. She holds a J.D. from the University of Michigan, a B.S. from Cornell University, and also studied at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore.

Jay Weiner

Rosette, LLP

Jay Weiner

Rosette, LLP
Jay Weiner is Of Counsel to the majority Indian-owned firm Rosette, LLP, and has worked with tribes and tribal governments since he interned for California Indian Legal Services while attending law school at the University of California at Berkeley from 1994 to 1997. After law school, Jay clerked for US District Judge Charles C. Lovell and served as Court Counsel to the Supreme Court to the Republic of Palau before joining Rob Rosette's law firm in Sacramento, California in 2003. Jay has developed extensive expertise in the area of federal Indian water law, has worked on multiple Indian water rights settlements, and has represented clients in adjudications and other water-related proceedings in Arizona, California, Montana, and Oregon. He practices in areas of federal environmental lawas well, including the Endangered Species Act and the National Environmental Policy Act. Jay also spent nine years as a staff attorney for the Montana Reserved Water Rights Compact Commission and another nine as an assistant attorney general in the Montana Attorney General’s Office handling water and other natural resources litigation on behalf of the State of Montana. In addition to his private practice work, he now serves as an administrative law judge for the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation hearing contested cases regarding DNRC water rights permit and change decisions.

Meena Westford

Metropolitan Water District of Southern California

Meena Westford

Metropolitan Water District of Southern California
As Senior Water Policy Manager at the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, Meena Westford is at the forefront of efforts to resolve some of the West’s most important water issues. Westford is a key member of the Metropolitan team that works on issues to resolve the ongoing imbalance of supplies and demands on the Colorado River, including assignments with environmental stakeholders and ColoradoRiver Tribes throughout the Southwest and with water entities in the Republic of Mexico.Prior to joining Metropolitan in June of 2012, Westford worked for the San Diego County Water Authority, managing the agency’s water use efficiency and dry-year water transfer programs. Westford also worked for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation for nearly 20 years, where she helped to develop one the agency’s first conservation programs and advanced other leading programs, such as its Title XVI programs, throughout the Mid-Pacific and Lower Colorado regions as well as held complex assignments in Washington, DC.Westford is a long-time San Diego resident. She earned her bachelor’s degree in Resource Economics from San Diego State University and holds a master’s degree in Environmental Policy and Management from the University of Denver. Her master thesis explored the future role of recycling and reuse to help advance solutions in the Colorado River basin.

Connie Woodhouse

The University of Arizona

Connie Woodhouse

The University of Arizona
I am a Regents’ professor in the School of Geography, Development, and Environment, with joint appointments in the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research and Department of Geosciences at the University of Arizona. My research focuses on the climatology and hydrology of the western and central US, using both observed data and paleoclimatic data from tree rings. A particular research interest of mine is droughts of the past, and on generating information that can assist decisions makers in planning for the future.